The Congo Dandies: living in poverty and spending a fortune to look like a million dollars

RT Documentary

Global Thrift Store (2014): In Senegal, cotton fields stretch as far as the eye can see. Yet this natural wealth is increasingly overlooked in favour of used foreign imports as the country experiences a boom in second-hand trading from Europe. For similar stories, see: Brutal life inside Thailand's sweatshops The Culture Of Fear Inside Nicaragua's Labour Markets Exposing The Abuse Behind Senegal's Koranic Schools Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: For downloads and more information visit: Like us on Facebook: Follow us on Twitter: Follow us on Instagram: "The French throw these clothes away? Really? They throw them away? " Fatou Dia, an employee at one of Senegal's second-hand sorting centres, is surprised to learn the origin of their stock. The country is experiencing a boom in second-hand trading, and separating unwanted garments enables Fatou to equip her daughter with school supplies. "I'm buying it little by little. I buy one thing, and then the next thing the next month. In this way, I manage". What is a lifeline to some is a business opportunity to others. "As far as wealth is concerned, human beings are never sated. Because he who does not have his own house is nothing". For Aliou Diallo, this cheap European clothing was a route to a better life. But in a country whose textile industry is rapidly disappearing from view, are these new imports doing more harm than good? Wild Angle Productions – Ref. 6092 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

Tens of thousands of people live in Zabbaleen, on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt, they all make a living out of recycling the entire capital city’s refuse. Their whole town is practically a giant dump and it provides them with almost everything they need: from kids’ toys to fodder for livestock. Even their pigs play an important part in recycling food waste. Most important of all though, the dump provides livelihoods for the people of Zabbaleen. Every one of the rubbish collectors plays their own part, gathering, transporting or sorting the rubbish. Collectively, everyone in the community performs a highly efficient job of recycling Cairo’s refuse. This allows the trash town to be self-sufficient and largely independent from the rest of the city. The place has its own rules, everyone is allocated their own patch of Cairo, no one would think of collecting from someone else’s area. Zabbaleen even has an unofficial mayor. Trash town has its own shops, cafes and a local school for the children. Of course it’s every Zabbaleen parent’s dream for their child to get a good education so they can build a better life elsewhere. More commonly though, the kids start working on the dump at a young age and follow in their parents’ footsteps to become rubbish collectors as well. The people of Zabbaleen do wish their lives weren’t as hard but feel no shame in their occupation. They see their work as socially important and pride themselves in providing for their families. After all, it’s a dirty job but someone has to do it. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: RTD ON TWITTER: RTD ON FACEBOOK: RTD ON DAILYMOTION RTD ON INSTAGRAM RTD LIVE.

2015.11.16T09:17:51
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